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VULCAN POWER SQUADRON
VPS Waypoints

Recommended Reading

Here are 34 books that VPS members enjoyed and heartily recommend to fellow boating fanatics...






Adrift: Seventy-six Days Lost at Sea (256 pp)
by Steven Callahan
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Against the Sea: Great Adventure Stories (272 pp)
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The Ahart Odyssey
by Dan & Jan Ahart
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(A web publication)

Dan and Jan Ahart are members of the Vulcan Power Squadron, but these days we seldom see them. They retired from their real world jobs on October 15, 1999, and left that day on their sailboat odyssey. These are the chapters of the Ahart Odyssey written as they travel...





All in the Same Boat: Living Aboard and Cruising (376 pp)
by Tom Neale
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American Practical Navigator ("Bowditch"): An Epitome of Navigation (873 pp)
by Nathaniel Bowditch (Originally)
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Regarded by many as the "Bible" of navigation, Bowditch's regularly-updated "American Practical Navigator" describes the modern principles of marine navigation and includes the formulas, tables, data and instructions required by navigators to perform the computations associated with dead reckoning, piloting, and celestial navigation. The publication also contains sections addressing the Practice of Navigation, Navigational Safety, Oceanography, Weather, and Electronic Navigation.





The Boater's Book of Nautical Terms (141 pp)
by David S. Yetman, John P. O'Connor (Editor)
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By the Grace of the Sea: A Woman's Solo Odyssey Around the World (388 pp)
by Pat Henry
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Chapman Piloting: Seamanship & Boat Handling (656 pp)
by Elbert S. Maloney, Charles Frederic Chapman
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Compass: A Story of Exploration and Innovation (288 pp)
by Alan Gurney
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Cruising in Seraffyn (192 pp)
by Lin & Larry Pardey
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Dutton's Navigation and Piloting (664 pp)
by Benjamin Dutton, Elbert S. Maloney
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First You Have to Row a Little Boat: Reflections on Life & Living (202 pp)
by Richard Bode
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Explores the parallels between navigating on the sea and navigating through life.
Favorite quote: The day will come when I will die. So the only matter of consequence before me is what I will do with my allotted time. I can remain on shore, paralyzed with fear, or I can raise my sails and dip and soar in the breeze.





The Grey Seas Under: The Perilous Rescue Missions of a N.A. Salvage Tug (360 pp)
by Farley Mowat
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Honey, Let's Get a Boat...: A Cruising Adventure of America's Great Loop (304 pp)
by Ron & Eva Stob
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In the Heart of the Sea: The Tragedy of the Whaleship Essex (302 pp)
by Nathaniel Philbrick
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Latitude Hooks and Azimuth Rings: How to Build and Use 18 Traditional Navigational Instruments (176 pp)
by Dennis Fisher
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Even if you don't build any of these old devices (the Kamal and Latitude Hook are pretty simple, the Astrolabe is another story), you'll gain some great insights with this book. It demonstrates not only how the ancients navigated, but also how one can use simple devices and a bit of trigonometry to accurately determine things like latitude and range.





Longitude: The True Story of a Lone Genius Who Solved the Greatest Scientific Problem of His Time (184 pp)
by Dava Sobel
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The Mariner's Book of Days (Spiral-bound) (112 pp)
by Peter H. Spectre
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This week-at-a-glance nautical desk diary and calendar is an ever-growing encyclopedia of marine fact, fiction and folklore. Entertaining and informative, every year the calendar is updated, making it a keeper well after the year is over and done.





The Nature of Boats: Insights and Esoterica for the Nautically Obsessed (418 pp)
by Dave Gerr
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Nautical Almanac (Commercial Edition) (358 pp)
by HM Almanac Office, UK Hydrographic Office
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Sure, it's not ACTUALLY reading material but it's a book every celestial navigator has to have. Plus how many books do you have that are published by Her Majesty's Nautical Almanac Office and the United Kingdom Hydrographic Office?





No Shoes Allowed (236 pp)
by Jan De Groot
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The Ocean Almanac (446 pp)
by Robert Hendrickson
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From the cover:
Being a Copius Compendium on Sea Creatures, Nautical Lore & Legend, Master Mariners, Naval Disasters, and Myriad Mysteries of the Deep





The Oxford Companion to Ships and the Sea (971 pp)
by Peter Kemp (Editor)
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Primer of Navigation (551 pp)
by George W. Mixter
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Quimby's Cruising Guide (272 pp)
by Nelson Spencer (Editor)
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Also can be ordered from the publisher at
"The Waterways Journal"
319 N. 4th Street, Suite 650
St. Louis, MO 63102
Cost: $27 (Includes shipping)





Rescue in the Pacific: A True Story of Disaster and Survival in a Force 12 Storm (288 pp)
by Tony Farrington
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Sailing the Dream (384 pp)
by John F. McGrady
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Salty Dog Talk: The Nautical Origins of Everyday Expressions (96 pp)
by Bill Beavis, Richard G. McCloskey
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Self-contained Celestial Navigation with HO 208 (240 pp)
by John S. Letcher
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Small Craft Advisory: A Book About the Building of a Boat (394 pp)
by Louis D. Rubin, Jr.
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Storm Tactics Handbook: Modern Methods of Heaving-to for Survival in Extreme Conditions, 3rd Edition (256 pp)
by Lin Pardey and Larry Pardey
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The Troller Yacht Book: A Powerboater's Guide to Crossing Oceans (192 pp)
by George Buehler
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Under Pressure: The Final Voyage of Submarine S-Five (260 pp)
by A. J. Hill
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In 1920, when the captain and crew of the S-Five submarine tested their new boat's ability to "crash dive"--submerse as quickly as possible--a faulty induction valve left the 40 men stranded at a depth of 180 feet. With nothing more than their own ingenuity they managed--just barely--to escape an underwater tomb.





When a Loose Cannon Flogs a Dead Horse There's the Devil to Pay: Seafaring Words in Everyday Speech (154 pp)
by Olivia A. Isil
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